Phase transformation in self-assembled Gd silicide nanostructures on Si(001)

Gangfeng Ye, Martin A. Crimp, Jun Nogami

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

  • 1 Citations

Abstract

Gd silicide nanostructures epitaxially grown on Si(001) are studied by plan-view transmission electron microscopy and associated nanobeam electron diffraction, as well as scanning tunneling microscopy. The nanobeam diffraction measurements show a direct correlation between the nanostructure morphology, either nanowires or islands, and the silicide crystal structure. Scanning tunneling microscopy shows a phase transformation from nanowires to islands that nucleate at nanowire intersections. A specific mechanism for this transformation is proposed that explains nanowire growth behavior previously observed on vicinal Si surfaces.

LanguageEnglish (US)
Pages2276-2281
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Materials Research
Volume26
Issue number17
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 28 2011

Profile

Nanowires
phase transformations
Nanostructures
nanowires
Phase transitions
Scanning tunneling microscopy
scanning tunneling microscopy
Electron diffraction
intersections
electron diffraction
Diffraction
Crystal structure
Transmission electron microscopy
transmission electron microscopy
crystal structure
diffraction

Keywords

  • Phase transformation
  • Scanning transmission electron microscopy
  • Scanning tunneling microscopy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Materials Science(all)
  • Mechanical Engineering
  • Mechanics of Materials
  • Condensed Matter Physics

Cite this

Phase transformation in self-assembled Gd silicide nanostructures on Si(001). / Ye, Gangfeng; Crimp, Martin A.; Nogami, Jun.

In: Journal of Materials Research, Vol. 26, No. 17, 28.08.2011, p. 2276-2281.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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