Polyols and organic acids adsorption onto activated carbon, and its role in aqueous-phase catalytic hydrogenation rates

Lars Peereboom, YuQing Q. Chen, James E. Jackson, Dennis J. Miller

    Research output: ResearchConference contribution

    Abstract

    Increasing global energy demands have driven research in both alternative renewable energy supplies and synthesis of commodity chemicals from bio-based feedstocks. The adsorption of glycerol, lactic acid, propanoic acid, and their hydrogenolysis products into activated carbon supports, was studied to characterize local concentrations in the catalyst pores and eventually incorporating local pore concentration into kinetic modeling and reactor design of hydrogenolysis. The use of activated carbon-supported catalysts for aqueous phase catalytic conversion of biorenewable, water-soluble substrates led to local enhancement in pore concentration of reactant and product species. Organic species with only modestly different structures demonstrated different affinities for adsorption in activated carbon; this difference in affinity had a strong effect on the observed rate of reactivity of the species over carbon-supported catalysts. This is an abstract of a paper presented at the AIChE Annual Meeting (San Francisco, CA 11/12-17/2006).

    LanguageEnglish (US)
    Title of host publicationAIChE Annual Meeting, Conference Proceedings
    StatePublished - 2006
    Event2006 AIChE Annual Meeting - San Francisco, CA, United States
    Duration: Nov 12 2006Nov 17 2006

    Other

    Other2006 AIChE Annual Meeting
    CountryUnited States
    CitySan Francisco, CA
    Period11/12/0611/17/06

    Profile

    Polyols
    Organic acids
    Activated carbon
    Hydrogenation
    Adsorption
    polyol
    Carbon
    Acids
    Hydrogenolysis
    Catalyst supports
    Lactic acid
    Glycerol
    Feedstocks
    Catalysts
    Kinetics
    Substrates
    Water
    Lactic Acid
    propionic acid
    Renewable Energy

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Biotechnology
    • Chemical Engineering(all)
    • Bioengineering
    • Safety, Risk, Reliability and Quality

    Cite this

    Polyols and organic acids adsorption onto activated carbon, and its role in aqueous-phase catalytic hydrogenation rates. / Peereboom, Lars; Chen, YuQing Q.; Jackson, James E.; Miller, Dennis J.

    AIChE Annual Meeting, Conference Proceedings. 2006.

    Research output: ResearchConference contribution

    Peereboom, L, Chen, YQ, Jackson, JE & Miller, DJ 2006, Polyols and organic acids adsorption onto activated carbon, and its role in aqueous-phase catalytic hydrogenation rates. in AIChE Annual Meeting, Conference Proceedings. 2006 AIChE Annual Meeting, San Francisco, CA, United States, 11/12/06.
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