Post-plant strategies for management of black root rot-related decline of perennial strawberry fields

Timothy D. Miles, Benjamin W. Glass, Roger W. Sysak, Annemiek C. Schilder

Research output: Research - peer-reviewArticle

Abstract

Perennial strawberries affected with black root rot generally decline in runner production, yield, and overall plant vigor over time. Several plant pathogens have been implicated in black root rot, including plant-parasitic nematodes, Pythium and Rhizoctonia spp. Pre-plant treatments such as a 3- to 5-year crop rotation or chemical fumigation are the main means of disease management. During 2007 and 2008, five post-plant treatments were evaluated for mitigation of strawberry black root rot in a naturally declining site in Ottawa County in Michigan. Fungicides and nutritional amendments were applied as drenches or foliar sprays. Most treatments increased runner establishment, yield, and overall plant vigor, particularly azoxystrobin and azoxystrobin + potassium phosphite. Root necrosis and incidence of root infection by binucleate Rhizoctonia spp. were reduced. Results were more apparent and significant in 2008 than in 2007, indicating cumulative effects over the 2 years of the trial. During 2008 and 2009, a large-scale demonstration trial was conducted with these treatments in a strawberry field with a history of black root rot in Leelanau County, MI. Improvements in bed fill and average plant weight and reductions in root necrosis and Rhizoctonia isolations were noted. This research represents the first post-plant chemical management strategy capable of slowing or even reversing the decline due to black root rot in established strawberry fields.

LanguageEnglish (US)
Pages78-85
Number of pages8
JournalCrop Protection
Volume104
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2018

Profile

strawberries
black root rot
Rhizoctonia
vigor
necrosis
azoxystrobin
Pythium
plant parasitic nematodes
fumigation
plant pathogens
fungicides
disease control
incidence
infection
potassium phosphite

Keywords

  • Binucleate Rhizoctonia
  • Fragaria × ananassa
  • Fungicides
  • Fusarium spp.
  • Nematodes
  • Nutritional amendments
  • Pythium spp.
  • Rhizoctonia fragariae

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agronomy and Crop Science

Cite this

Post-plant strategies for management of black root rot-related decline of perennial strawberry fields. / Miles, Timothy D.; Glass, Benjamin W.; Sysak, Roger W.; Schilder, Annemiek C.

In: Crop Protection, Vol. 104, 01.02.2018, p. 78-85.

Research output: Research - peer-reviewArticle

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