Practical roadmap and limits to nanostructured photovoltaics

Richard R. Lunt, Timothy P. Osedach, Patrick R. Brown, Jill A. Rowehl, Vladimir Bulović

    Research output: Research - peer-reviewArticle

    • 115 Citations

    Abstract

    The significant research interest in the engineering of photovoltaic (PV) structures at the nanoscale is directed toward enabling reductions in PV module fabrication and installation costs as well as improving cell power conversion efficiency (PCE). With the emergence of a multitude of nanostructured photovoltaic (nano-PV) device architectures, the question has arisen of where both the practical and the fundamental limits of performance reside in these new systems. Here, the former is addressed a posteriori. The specific challenges associated with improving the electrical power conversion efficiency of various nano-PV technologies are discussed and several approaches to reduce their thermal losses beyond the single bandgap limit are reviewed. Critical considerations related to the module lifetime and cost that are unique to nano-PV architectures are also addressed. The analysis suggests that a practical single-junction laboratory power conversion efficiency limit of 17% and a two-cell tandem power conversion efficiency limit of 24% are possible for nano-PVs, which, when combined with operating lifetimes of 10 to 15 years, could position them as a transformational technology for solar energy markets. The practical efficiency limits for nanostructured photovoltaics including organic small molecule, dye-sensitized, polymer, and colloidal-quantum-dot architectures estimated a posteriori are assessed. The specific challenges associated with improving the electrical power conversion efficiency of various nanostructured photovoltaic (nano-PV) technologies are discussed and several approaches to reduce their thermal losses beyond the single bandgap limit are reviewed. Critical considerations related to the module lifetime and cost that are unique to nano-PV architectures are also discussed.

    LanguageEnglish (US)
    Pages5712-5727
    Number of pages16
    JournalAdvanced Materials
    Volume23
    Issue number48
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Dec 22 2011

    Profile

    Conversion efficiency
    Costs
    Energy gap
    Hot Temperature
    Solar energy
    Semiconductor quantum dots
    Polymers
    Coloring Agents
    Fabrication
    Molecules
    Dyes

    Keywords

    • colloidal nanocrystals
    • colloidal quantum dots
    • efficiency limits
    • molecular semiconductors
    • nanostructured photovoltaics
    • organic semiconductors

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Materials Science(all)
    • Mechanics of Materials
    • Mechanical Engineering

    Cite this

    Lunt, R. R., Osedach, T. P., Brown, P. R., Rowehl, J. A., & Bulović, V. (2011). Practical roadmap and limits to nanostructured photovoltaics. Advanced Materials, 23(48), 5712-5727. DOI: 10.1002/adma.201103404

    Practical roadmap and limits to nanostructured photovoltaics. / Lunt, Richard R.; Osedach, Timothy P.; Brown, Patrick R.; Rowehl, Jill A.; Bulović, Vladimir.

    In: Advanced Materials, Vol. 23, No. 48, 22.12.2011, p. 5712-5727.

    Research output: Research - peer-reviewArticle

    Lunt, RR, Osedach, TP, Brown, PR, Rowehl, JA & Bulović, V 2011, 'Practical roadmap and limits to nanostructured photovoltaics' Advanced Materials, vol 23, no. 48, pp. 5712-5727. DOI: 10.1002/adma.201103404
    Lunt RR, Osedach TP, Brown PR, Rowehl JA, Bulović V. Practical roadmap and limits to nanostructured photovoltaics. Advanced Materials. 2011 Dec 22;23(48):5712-5727. Available from, DOI: 10.1002/adma.201103404
    Lunt, Richard R. ; Osedach, Timothy P. ; Brown, Patrick R. ; Rowehl, Jill A. ; Bulović, Vladimir. / Practical roadmap and limits to nanostructured photovoltaics. In: Advanced Materials. 2011 ; Vol. 23, No. 48. pp. 5712-5727
    @article{478a79eb2cf14a4dbae189af754da920,
    title = "Practical roadmap and limits to nanostructured photovoltaics",
    abstract = "The significant research interest in the engineering of photovoltaic (PV) structures at the nanoscale is directed toward enabling reductions in PV module fabrication and installation costs as well as improving cell power conversion efficiency (PCE). With the emergence of a multitude of nanostructured photovoltaic (nano-PV) device architectures, the question has arisen of where both the practical and the fundamental limits of performance reside in these new systems. Here, the former is addressed a posteriori. The specific challenges associated with improving the electrical power conversion efficiency of various nano-PV technologies are discussed and several approaches to reduce their thermal losses beyond the single bandgap limit are reviewed. Critical considerations related to the module lifetime and cost that are unique to nano-PV architectures are also addressed. The analysis suggests that a practical single-junction laboratory power conversion efficiency limit of 17% and a two-cell tandem power conversion efficiency limit of 24% are possible for nano-PVs, which, when combined with operating lifetimes of 10 to 15 years, could position them as a transformational technology for solar energy markets. The practical efficiency limits for nanostructured photovoltaics including organic small molecule, dye-sensitized, polymer, and colloidal-quantum-dot architectures estimated a posteriori are assessed. The specific challenges associated with improving the electrical power conversion efficiency of various nanostructured photovoltaic (nano-PV) technologies are discussed and several approaches to reduce their thermal losses beyond the single bandgap limit are reviewed. Critical considerations related to the module lifetime and cost that are unique to nano-PV architectures are also discussed.",
    keywords = "colloidal nanocrystals, colloidal quantum dots, efficiency limits, molecular semiconductors, nanostructured photovoltaics, organic semiconductors",
    author = "Lunt, {Richard R.} and Osedach, {Timothy P.} and Brown, {Patrick R.} and Rowehl, {Jill A.} and Vladimir Bulović",
    year = "2011",
    month = "12",
    doi = "10.1002/adma.201103404",
    volume = "23",
    pages = "5712--5727",
    journal = "Advanced Materials",
    issn = "0935-9648",
    publisher = "Wiley-VCH Verlag",
    number = "48",

    }

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - Practical roadmap and limits to nanostructured photovoltaics

    AU - Lunt,Richard R.

    AU - Osedach,Timothy P.

    AU - Brown,Patrick R.

    AU - Rowehl,Jill A.

    AU - Bulović,Vladimir

    PY - 2011/12/22

    Y1 - 2011/12/22

    N2 - The significant research interest in the engineering of photovoltaic (PV) structures at the nanoscale is directed toward enabling reductions in PV module fabrication and installation costs as well as improving cell power conversion efficiency (PCE). With the emergence of a multitude of nanostructured photovoltaic (nano-PV) device architectures, the question has arisen of where both the practical and the fundamental limits of performance reside in these new systems. Here, the former is addressed a posteriori. The specific challenges associated with improving the electrical power conversion efficiency of various nano-PV technologies are discussed and several approaches to reduce their thermal losses beyond the single bandgap limit are reviewed. Critical considerations related to the module lifetime and cost that are unique to nano-PV architectures are also addressed. The analysis suggests that a practical single-junction laboratory power conversion efficiency limit of 17% and a two-cell tandem power conversion efficiency limit of 24% are possible for nano-PVs, which, when combined with operating lifetimes of 10 to 15 years, could position them as a transformational technology for solar energy markets. The practical efficiency limits for nanostructured photovoltaics including organic small molecule, dye-sensitized, polymer, and colloidal-quantum-dot architectures estimated a posteriori are assessed. The specific challenges associated with improving the electrical power conversion efficiency of various nanostructured photovoltaic (nano-PV) technologies are discussed and several approaches to reduce their thermal losses beyond the single bandgap limit are reviewed. Critical considerations related to the module lifetime and cost that are unique to nano-PV architectures are also discussed.

    AB - The significant research interest in the engineering of photovoltaic (PV) structures at the nanoscale is directed toward enabling reductions in PV module fabrication and installation costs as well as improving cell power conversion efficiency (PCE). With the emergence of a multitude of nanostructured photovoltaic (nano-PV) device architectures, the question has arisen of where both the practical and the fundamental limits of performance reside in these new systems. Here, the former is addressed a posteriori. The specific challenges associated with improving the electrical power conversion efficiency of various nano-PV technologies are discussed and several approaches to reduce their thermal losses beyond the single bandgap limit are reviewed. Critical considerations related to the module lifetime and cost that are unique to nano-PV architectures are also addressed. The analysis suggests that a practical single-junction laboratory power conversion efficiency limit of 17% and a two-cell tandem power conversion efficiency limit of 24% are possible for nano-PVs, which, when combined with operating lifetimes of 10 to 15 years, could position them as a transformational technology for solar energy markets. The practical efficiency limits for nanostructured photovoltaics including organic small molecule, dye-sensitized, polymer, and colloidal-quantum-dot architectures estimated a posteriori are assessed. The specific challenges associated with improving the electrical power conversion efficiency of various nanostructured photovoltaic (nano-PV) technologies are discussed and several approaches to reduce their thermal losses beyond the single bandgap limit are reviewed. Critical considerations related to the module lifetime and cost that are unique to nano-PV architectures are also discussed.

    KW - colloidal nanocrystals

    KW - colloidal quantum dots

    KW - efficiency limits

    KW - molecular semiconductors

    KW - nanostructured photovoltaics

    KW - organic semiconductors

    UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=83755205344&partnerID=8YFLogxK

    UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=83755205344&partnerID=8YFLogxK

    U2 - 10.1002/adma.201103404

    DO - 10.1002/adma.201103404

    M3 - Article

    VL - 23

    SP - 5712

    EP - 5727

    JO - Advanced Materials

    T2 - Advanced Materials

    JF - Advanced Materials

    SN - 0935-9648

    IS - 48

    ER -