Properties and damage mechanism in three classes of titanium composite matrices

C. J. Boehlert, B. S. Majumdar, D. Eylon

Research output: Research - peer-reviewArticle

  • 5 Citations

Abstract

Three important classes of titanium alloys are being considered as candidate matrix materials for high temperature metal matrix composites (MMCs): (i) the disordered alloys comprising the α + β and metastable β Ti-alloys, (ii) the α2+β alloys containing the ordered α2 phase, and (iii) the O + B2 + α2 alloys containing the ordered orthorhombic (0) phase and the ordered bcc (B2) and α2 phases. The properties of the alloys have significant influence on the matrix dominated properties, such as the fatigue and transverse creep response, of the composite. Therefore, the comparative behavior of the three classes of alloys were examined in this investigation, using the Timetalr21S, the Ti-24Al-11Nb, and the Ti-25Al-17Nb alloy, as being representative of each class. The tension, fatigue, and creep properties are compared, and some of the property differences are rationalized in terms of the micromechanisms of deformation and damage. The microstructure containing a majority of platelet O phase, in Ti-25Al-17Nb, provided a more attractive combination of room and elevated temperature properties than those of the α+β and α2+β matrix alloys.

LanguageEnglish (US)
Pages843-850
Number of pages8
JournalKey Engineering Materials
Volume127-131
Issue numberPt 2
StatePublished - 1997
Externally publishedYes

Profile

Titanium
Composite materials
Creep
Fatigue of materials
Temperature
Platelets
Titanium alloys
Metals
Microstructure

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Chemical Engineering (miscellaneous)
  • Ceramics and Composites

Cite this

Properties and damage mechanism in three classes of titanium composite matrices. / Boehlert, C. J.; Majumdar, B. S.; Eylon, D.

In: Key Engineering Materials, Vol. 127-131, No. Pt 2, 1997, p. 843-850.

Research output: Research - peer-reviewArticle

Boehlert, C. J. ; Majumdar, B. S. ; Eylon, D./ Properties and damage mechanism in three classes of titanium composite matrices. In: Key Engineering Materials. 1997 ; Vol. 127-131, No. Pt 2. pp. 843-850
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