Reaction and Spectroscopic Studies of Sodium Salt Catalysts for Lactic Acid Conversion

Man S. Tam, Garry C. Gunter, Radu Craciun, Dennis J. Miller, James E. Jackson

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    • 42 Citations

    Abstract

    Catalytic conversion of lactic acid to 2,3-pentanedione over sodium salts and base on low surface area silica support has been studied. Yield and selectivity toward 2,3-pentanedione are optimal at around 300°C, 3-4 s residence time, and 0.5 MPa total pressure. Anions of initial salt catalysts used do not participate in lactic acid condensation to 2,3-pentanedione once steady-state conditions have been achieved; instead, sodium lactate has been identified by postreaction FTIR spectroscopy as the primary, stable species on the support during reaction. Sodium lactate is believed to be an intermediate in 2,3-pentanedione formation. Conversion of a sodium salt to sodium lactate is greatest when the salt used has a low melting point and a volatile conjugate acid; the extent of conversion depends weakly on reaction time and temperature within experimental conditions. At high temperature (∼350°C), sodium lactate decomposes to sodium propanoate and sodium acetate, which may explain reduced 2,3-pentanedione yields at higher temperatures.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)3505-3512
    Number of pages8
    JournalIndustrial and Engineering Chemistry Research
    Volume36
    Issue number9
    StatePublished - Sep 1997

    Profile

    Sodium Lactate
    Lactic Acid
    Salts
    Sodium
    sodium
    Temperature
    Acetanilides
    salt
    acid
    Afferent Loop Syndrome
    Lactic acid
    Sodium Acetate
    Propionates
    Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy
    Silicon Dioxide
    Freezing
    Anions
    Spectrum Analysis
    Acids
    catalyst

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Chemical Engineering (miscellaneous)
    • Environmental Science(all)
    • Polymers and Plastics

    Cite this

    Reaction and Spectroscopic Studies of Sodium Salt Catalysts for Lactic Acid Conversion. / Tam, Man S.; Gunter, Garry C.; Craciun, Radu; Miller, Dennis J.; Jackson, James E.

    In: Industrial and Engineering Chemistry Research, Vol. 36, No. 9, 09.1997, p. 3505-3512.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Tam, Man S.; Gunter, Garry C.; Craciun, Radu; Miller, Dennis J.; Jackson, James E. / Reaction and Spectroscopic Studies of Sodium Salt Catalysts for Lactic Acid Conversion.

    In: Industrial and Engineering Chemistry Research, Vol. 36, No. 9, 09.1997, p. 3505-3512.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    @article{180bc181dbdb458f80447ba911a9091d,
    title = "Reaction and Spectroscopic Studies of Sodium Salt Catalysts for Lactic Acid Conversion",
    abstract = "Catalytic conversion of lactic acid to 2,3-pentanedione over sodium salts and base on low surface area silica support has been studied. Yield and selectivity toward 2,3-pentanedione are optimal at around 300°C, 3-4 s residence time, and 0.5 MPa total pressure. Anions of initial salt catalysts used do not participate in lactic acid condensation to 2,3-pentanedione once steady-state conditions have been achieved; instead, sodium lactate has been identified by postreaction FTIR spectroscopy as the primary, stable species on the support during reaction. Sodium lactate is believed to be an intermediate in 2,3-pentanedione formation. Conversion of a sodium salt to sodium lactate is greatest when the salt used has a low melting point and a volatile conjugate acid; the extent of conversion depends weakly on reaction time and temperature within experimental conditions. At high temperature (∼350°C), sodium lactate decomposes to sodium propanoate and sodium acetate, which may explain reduced 2,3-pentanedione yields at higher temperatures.",
    author = "Tam, {Man S.} and Gunter, {Garry C.} and Radu Craciun and Miller, {Dennis J.} and Jackson, {James E.}",
    year = "1997",
    month = "9",
    volume = "36",
    pages = "3505--3512",
    journal = "Industrial & Engineering Chemistry Product Research and Development",
    issn = "0888-5885",
    publisher = "American Chemical Society",
    number = "9",

    }

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - Reaction and Spectroscopic Studies of Sodium Salt Catalysts for Lactic Acid Conversion

    AU - Tam,Man S.

    AU - Gunter,Garry C.

    AU - Craciun,Radu

    AU - Miller,Dennis J.

    AU - Jackson,James E.

    PY - 1997/9

    Y1 - 1997/9

    N2 - Catalytic conversion of lactic acid to 2,3-pentanedione over sodium salts and base on low surface area silica support has been studied. Yield and selectivity toward 2,3-pentanedione are optimal at around 300°C, 3-4 s residence time, and 0.5 MPa total pressure. Anions of initial salt catalysts used do not participate in lactic acid condensation to 2,3-pentanedione once steady-state conditions have been achieved; instead, sodium lactate has been identified by postreaction FTIR spectroscopy as the primary, stable species on the support during reaction. Sodium lactate is believed to be an intermediate in 2,3-pentanedione formation. Conversion of a sodium salt to sodium lactate is greatest when the salt used has a low melting point and a volatile conjugate acid; the extent of conversion depends weakly on reaction time and temperature within experimental conditions. At high temperature (∼350°C), sodium lactate decomposes to sodium propanoate and sodium acetate, which may explain reduced 2,3-pentanedione yields at higher temperatures.

    AB - Catalytic conversion of lactic acid to 2,3-pentanedione over sodium salts and base on low surface area silica support has been studied. Yield and selectivity toward 2,3-pentanedione are optimal at around 300°C, 3-4 s residence time, and 0.5 MPa total pressure. Anions of initial salt catalysts used do not participate in lactic acid condensation to 2,3-pentanedione once steady-state conditions have been achieved; instead, sodium lactate has been identified by postreaction FTIR spectroscopy as the primary, stable species on the support during reaction. Sodium lactate is believed to be an intermediate in 2,3-pentanedione formation. Conversion of a sodium salt to sodium lactate is greatest when the salt used has a low melting point and a volatile conjugate acid; the extent of conversion depends weakly on reaction time and temperature within experimental conditions. At high temperature (∼350°C), sodium lactate decomposes to sodium propanoate and sodium acetate, which may explain reduced 2,3-pentanedione yields at higher temperatures.

    UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0031236724&partnerID=8YFLogxK

    UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0031236724&partnerID=8YFLogxK

    M3 - Article

    VL - 36

    SP - 3505

    EP - 3512

    JO - Industrial & Engineering Chemistry Product Research and Development

    T2 - Industrial & Engineering Chemistry Product Research and Development

    JF - Industrial & Engineering Chemistry Product Research and Development

    SN - 0888-5885

    IS - 9

    ER -