Rheological Modeling of Corn Starch Doughs At Low to Intermediate Moisture

KEVIN L. MACKEY, ROBERT Y. OFOLI

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

  • 22 Citations

Abstract

A generalized model for predicting the extrudate viscosity of starch based products at low to intermediate moisture content is presented. It incorporates the effects of shear rate, temperature, moisture content, time‐temperature history and strain history. The model was tested using corn starch dough at various moisture contents. An Instron capillary rheometer and a Baker Perkins MPF 50 D/25 co‐rotating twin screw extruder were used to collect all data. Viscosity was found to be a function of cook temperature and moisture content but not cook time. Observed versus predicted viscosity gave an R2 of 0.975 after accounting for shear rate, temperature, moisture content and time‐temperature history in the capillary rheometer. Extrusion tests indicated that correction for strain history was important for highly puffed extrudates.

LanguageEnglish (US)
Pages417-423
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Food Science
Volume55
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 1990

Profile

corn starch
dough
Starch
Zea mays
water content
Temperature
Viscosity
history
viscosity
temperature
shears
History
extruders
screws
extrusion
starch
testing
rheometers

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Science

Cite this

Rheological Modeling of Corn Starch Doughs At Low to Intermediate Moisture. / MACKEY, KEVIN L.; OFOLI, ROBERT Y.

In: Journal of Food Science, Vol. 55, No. 2, 1990, p. 417-423.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{d1525de44ac44c9e899229b9733c3f38,
title = "Rheological Modeling of Corn Starch Doughs At Low to Intermediate Moisture",
abstract = "A generalized model for predicting the extrudate viscosity of starch based products at low to intermediate moisture content is presented. It incorporates the effects of shear rate, temperature, moisture content, time‐temperature history and strain history. The model was tested using corn starch dough at various moisture contents. An Instron capillary rheometer and a Baker Perkins MPF 50 D/25 co‐rotating twin screw extruder were used to collect all data. Viscosity was found to be a function of cook temperature and moisture content but not cook time. Observed versus predicted viscosity gave an R2 of 0.975 after accounting for shear rate, temperature, moisture content and time‐temperature history in the capillary rheometer. Extrusion tests indicated that correction for strain history was important for highly puffed extrudates.",
author = "MACKEY, {KEVIN L.} and OFOLI, {ROBERT Y.}",
year = "1990",
doi = "10.1111/j.1365-2621.1990.tb06777.x",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "55",
pages = "417--423",
journal = "Journal of Food Science",
issn = "0022-1147",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Rheological Modeling of Corn Starch Doughs At Low to Intermediate Moisture

AU - MACKEY,KEVIN L.

AU - OFOLI,ROBERT Y.

PY - 1990

Y1 - 1990

N2 - A generalized model for predicting the extrudate viscosity of starch based products at low to intermediate moisture content is presented. It incorporates the effects of shear rate, temperature, moisture content, time‐temperature history and strain history. The model was tested using corn starch dough at various moisture contents. An Instron capillary rheometer and a Baker Perkins MPF 50 D/25 co‐rotating twin screw extruder were used to collect all data. Viscosity was found to be a function of cook temperature and moisture content but not cook time. Observed versus predicted viscosity gave an R2 of 0.975 after accounting for shear rate, temperature, moisture content and time‐temperature history in the capillary rheometer. Extrusion tests indicated that correction for strain history was important for highly puffed extrudates.

AB - A generalized model for predicting the extrudate viscosity of starch based products at low to intermediate moisture content is presented. It incorporates the effects of shear rate, temperature, moisture content, time‐temperature history and strain history. The model was tested using corn starch dough at various moisture contents. An Instron capillary rheometer and a Baker Perkins MPF 50 D/25 co‐rotating twin screw extruder were used to collect all data. Viscosity was found to be a function of cook temperature and moisture content but not cook time. Observed versus predicted viscosity gave an R2 of 0.975 after accounting for shear rate, temperature, moisture content and time‐temperature history in the capillary rheometer. Extrusion tests indicated that correction for strain history was important for highly puffed extrudates.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84987262231&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84987262231&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1111/j.1365-2621.1990.tb06777.x

DO - 10.1111/j.1365-2621.1990.tb06777.x

M3 - Article

VL - 55

SP - 417

EP - 423

JO - Journal of Food Science

T2 - Journal of Food Science

JF - Journal of Food Science

SN - 0022-1147

IS - 2

ER -