Scale-up and integration of alkaline hydrogen peroxide pretreatment, enzymatic hydrolysis, and ethanolic fermentation

Goutami Banerjee, Suzana Car, Tongjun Liu, Daniel L. Williams, Sarynna López Meza, Jonathan D. Walton, David B. Hodge

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Alkaline hydrogen peroxide (AHP) has several attractive features as a pretreatment in the lignocellulosic biomass-to-ethanol pipeline. Here, the feasibility of scaling-up the AHP process and integrating it with enzymatic hydrolysis and fermentation was studied. Corn stover (1kg) was subjected to AHP pretreatment, hydrolyzed enzymatically, and the resulting sugars fermented to ethanol. The AHP pretreatment was performed at 0.125g H2O2/g biomass, 22°C, and atmospheric pressure for 48h with periodic pH readjustment. The enzymatic hydrolysis was performed in the same reactor following pH neutralization of the biomass slurry and without washing. After 48h, glucose and xylose yields were 75% and 71% of the theoretical maximum. Sterility was maintained during pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis without the use of antibiotics. During fermentation using a glucose- and xylose-utilizing strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, all of the Glc and 67% of the Xyl were consumed in 120h. The final ethanol titer was 13.7g/L. Treatment of the enzymatic hydrolysate with activated carbon prior to fermentation had little effect on Glc fermentation but markedly improved utilization of Xyl, presumably due to the removal of soluble aromatic inhibitors. The results indicate that AHP is readily scalable and can be integrated with enzyme hydrolysis and fermentation. Compared to other leading pretreatments for lignocellulosic biomass, AHP has potential advantages with regard to capital costs, process simplicity, feedstock handling, and compatibility with enzymatic deconstruction and fermentation.

LanguageEnglish (US)
Pages922-931
Number of pages10
JournalBiotechnology and Bioengineering
Volume109
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2012

Profile

Enzymatic hydrolysis
Hydrogen peroxide
Fermentation
Hydrogen Peroxide
Hydrolysis
Biomass
Xylose
Ethanol
Glucose
Atmospheric Pressure
Antibiotics
Washing
Sugars
Yeast
Activated carbon
Feedstocks
Infertility
Atmospheric pressure
Zea mays
Saccharomyces cerevisiae

Keywords

  • Bioenergy
  • Biomass
  • Cellulase
  • Corn stover
  • Fermentation
  • Hydrogen peroxide

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biotechnology
  • Bioengineering
  • Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology

Cite this

Scale-up and integration of alkaline hydrogen peroxide pretreatment, enzymatic hydrolysis, and ethanolic fermentation. / Banerjee, Goutami; Car, Suzana; Liu, Tongjun; Williams, Daniel L.; Meza, Sarynna López; Walton, Jonathan D.; Hodge, David B.

In: Biotechnology and Bioengineering, Vol. 109, No. 4, 04.2012, p. 922-931.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Banerjee, Goutami ; Car, Suzana ; Liu, Tongjun ; Williams, Daniel L. ; Meza, Sarynna López ; Walton, Jonathan D. ; Hodge, David B./ Scale-up and integration of alkaline hydrogen peroxide pretreatment, enzymatic hydrolysis, and ethanolic fermentation. In: Biotechnology and Bioengineering. 2012 ; Vol. 109, No. 4. pp. 922-931
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