Schwann Cells Migration on Patterned Polydimethylsiloxane Microgrooved Surface

Chun Liu, Jeremy Kray, Victoria Toomajian, Christina Chan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

  • 2 Citations

Abstract

Schwann cells (SCs) aid in nerve repair in the peripheral nervous system, and their ability to migrate into the injury site is critical for nerve regeneration after injury. The majority of studies on SC behavior have focused on SC alignment through contact guidance, rather than migration. The few studies on SC migration primarily investigated the migration of individual cells over several hours with time-lapse microscopy. However, during neural tissue repair, SCs do not migrate as single cells but as a population of cells over physiologically relevant time and length scales. Thus from a practical perspective, there is a need to understand the migration of large populations of SC and the collective guidance cues from the surrounding environment in designing optimal transplantable scaffolds. This study investigates a large population of migrating SCs over a period of 2 weeks on patterned polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microgrooved channels of different sizes. Two methods were used to quantify the migration velocity of a large cell population that minimized the confounding effect due to cell proliferation: one based on a leading edge velocity and a second based on a binary velocity. Both approaches showed that the SC population migrated the fastest on the smallest sized microgrooved channels. The insights provided in this study could inform on future designs of transplantable scaffolds for peripheral nerve regeneration.

LanguageEnglish (US)
Pages644-651
Number of pages8
JournalTissue Engineering - Part C: Methods
Volume22
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2016

Profile

Schwann Cells
Polydimethylsiloxane
Cell Movement
Cells
Nerve Regeneration
Population
Scaffolds
Repair
Cell proliferation
Neurology
Aptitude
baysilon
Peripheral Nervous System
Wounds and Injuries
Peripheral Nerves
Microscopic examination
Cues
Microscopy
Tissue
Cell Proliferation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Bioengineering
  • Medicine (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Schwann Cells Migration on Patterned Polydimethylsiloxane Microgrooved Surface. / Liu, Chun; Kray, Jeremy; Toomajian, Victoria; Chan, Christina.

In: Tissue Engineering - Part C: Methods, Vol. 22, No. 7, 01.07.2016, p. 644-651.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Liu, Chun ; Kray, Jeremy ; Toomajian, Victoria ; Chan, Christina. / Schwann Cells Migration on Patterned Polydimethylsiloxane Microgrooved Surface. In: Tissue Engineering - Part C: Methods. 2016 ; Vol. 22, No. 7. pp. 644-651
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