Self-assembled thulium silicide nanostructures on silicon(001) studied by scanning tunneling microscopy and transmission electron microscopy

J. Zhang, M. A. Crimp, Y. Cui, J. Nogami

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    • 9 Citations

    Abstract

    Since the formation of epitaxial silicide nanowires by deposition of rare earth (RE) metals on Si(001) was first discovered, intense interest has been focused on their growth mechanism. Unlike many of the other nanowire forming RE metals, which have several different polymorphic silicides at about the same stoichiometry, thulium forms three bulk silicides, Tm5 Si3, TmSi, and Tm3 Si5, with very different compositions and crystal structures. Due to their lattice mismatch anisotropy with the substrate when grown on the Si(001) surface, the latter two phases have the potential for nanowire formation. Scanning tunneling microscopy shows the formation of both nanowires and larger square islands. Cross-sectional high resolution transmission electron microscopy reveals both orthorhombic TmSi and hexagonal Tm3 Si5, forming nanostructures either as connected neighboring structures or as overlapping structures. The coexistence of layers of both silicides in many nanostructures suggests a new mechanism for strain relief at the interface with the substrate.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Article number064308
    JournalJournal of Applied Physics
    Volume103
    Issue number6
    DOIs
    StatePublished - 2008

    Profile

    nanowires
    silicides
    thulium
    scanning tunneling microscopy
    rare earth elements
    transmission electron microscopy
    metals
    stoichiometry
    anisotropy
    crystal structure
    high resolution
    silicon

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Physics and Astronomy (miscellaneous)
    • Physics and Astronomy(all)

    Cite this

    Self-assembled thulium silicide nanostructures on silicon(001) studied by scanning tunneling microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. / Zhang, J.; Crimp, M. A.; Cui, Y.; Nogami, J.

    In: Journal of Applied Physics, Vol. 103, No. 6, 064308, 2008.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Zhang, J.; Crimp, M. A.; Cui, Y.; Nogami, J. / Self-assembled thulium silicide nanostructures on silicon(001) studied by scanning tunneling microscopy and transmission electron microscopy.

    In: Journal of Applied Physics, Vol. 103, No. 6, 064308, 2008.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    @article{cd80716a389c494a8b44e1db8bce8ec4,
    title = "Self-assembled thulium silicide nanostructures on silicon(001) studied by scanning tunneling microscopy and transmission electron microscopy",
    abstract = "Since the formation of epitaxial silicide nanowires by deposition of rare earth (RE) metals on Si(001) was first discovered, intense interest has been focused on their growth mechanism. Unlike many of the other nanowire forming RE metals, which have several different polymorphic silicides at about the same stoichiometry, thulium forms three bulk silicides, Tm5 Si3, TmSi, and Tm3 Si5, with very different compositions and crystal structures. Due to their lattice mismatch anisotropy with the substrate when grown on the Si(001) surface, the latter two phases have the potential for nanowire formation. Scanning tunneling microscopy shows the formation of both nanowires and larger square islands. Cross-sectional high resolution transmission electron microscopy reveals both orthorhombic TmSi and hexagonal Tm3 Si5, forming nanostructures either as connected neighboring structures or as overlapping structures. The coexistence of layers of both silicides in many nanostructures suggests a new mechanism for strain relief at the interface with the substrate.",
    author = "J. Zhang and Crimp, {M. A.} and Y. Cui and J. Nogami",
    year = "2008",
    doi = "10.1063/1.2896414",
    volume = "103",
    journal = "Journal of Applied Physics",
    issn = "0021-8979",
    publisher = "American Institute of Physics Publising LLC",
    number = "6",

    }

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - Self-assembled thulium silicide nanostructures on silicon(001) studied by scanning tunneling microscopy and transmission electron microscopy

    AU - Zhang,J.

    AU - Crimp,M. A.

    AU - Cui,Y.

    AU - Nogami,J.

    PY - 2008

    Y1 - 2008

    N2 - Since the formation of epitaxial silicide nanowires by deposition of rare earth (RE) metals on Si(001) was first discovered, intense interest has been focused on their growth mechanism. Unlike many of the other nanowire forming RE metals, which have several different polymorphic silicides at about the same stoichiometry, thulium forms three bulk silicides, Tm5 Si3, TmSi, and Tm3 Si5, with very different compositions and crystal structures. Due to their lattice mismatch anisotropy with the substrate when grown on the Si(001) surface, the latter two phases have the potential for nanowire formation. Scanning tunneling microscopy shows the formation of both nanowires and larger square islands. Cross-sectional high resolution transmission electron microscopy reveals both orthorhombic TmSi and hexagonal Tm3 Si5, forming nanostructures either as connected neighboring structures or as overlapping structures. The coexistence of layers of both silicides in many nanostructures suggests a new mechanism for strain relief at the interface with the substrate.

    AB - Since the formation of epitaxial silicide nanowires by deposition of rare earth (RE) metals on Si(001) was first discovered, intense interest has been focused on their growth mechanism. Unlike many of the other nanowire forming RE metals, which have several different polymorphic silicides at about the same stoichiometry, thulium forms three bulk silicides, Tm5 Si3, TmSi, and Tm3 Si5, with very different compositions and crystal structures. Due to their lattice mismatch anisotropy with the substrate when grown on the Si(001) surface, the latter two phases have the potential for nanowire formation. Scanning tunneling microscopy shows the formation of both nanowires and larger square islands. Cross-sectional high resolution transmission electron microscopy reveals both orthorhombic TmSi and hexagonal Tm3 Si5, forming nanostructures either as connected neighboring structures or as overlapping structures. The coexistence of layers of both silicides in many nanostructures suggests a new mechanism for strain relief at the interface with the substrate.

    UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=41549133120&partnerID=8YFLogxK

    UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=41549133120&partnerID=8YFLogxK

    U2 - 10.1063/1.2896414

    DO - 10.1063/1.2896414

    M3 - Article

    VL - 103

    JO - Journal of Applied Physics

    T2 - Journal of Applied Physics

    JF - Journal of Applied Physics

    SN - 0021-8979

    IS - 6

    M1 - 064308

    ER -