Soybean-based polyols and silanols

D. Graiver, K. W. Farminer, R. Narayan

Research output: ResearchConference contribution

Abstract

Both the oil and the meal in soybeans are attractive raw materials for a wide variety of high value chemicals and intermediates. Soybean is readily available at a relatively low price and is grown domestically. Hence, it is a stable, relatively inexpensive source of raw materials, which is less affected than crude oil by geo-political events. Although soybean is cultivated worldwide primarily for feed, both the oil and the meal can be used as starting materials for different industrial products and intermediates. The following is a brief summary of our recent studies for utilizing soybeans for high value industrial applications. Examples include manufacturing of linear amide-diols from dimer fatty acids. These polyols are less susceptible to radical degradation induced by heat, oxidation or ultraviolet radiation than ether-diols and are more resistance to hydrolysis than ester-diols. Unlike other polyols derived from soy triglycerides, these polyols are difunctional, which makes them suitable for use in linear polyurethanes, polyesters and polyacetals. Another example of amide-polyols are those derived from soy meal. These polyols are prepared by transamidation of soy proteins with ethanol amine. One of the most interesting attributes of these polyols is the self catalytic property when used to manufacture rigid PU foams. Silylation of the unsaturated fatty acids in the soy triglycerides with reactive silanes led to a novel one-component, moisture activated cure useful for protective coatings. These silylated soybean oils were also used to prepare interpenetrating polymer networks with silicone polymers. This technology enabled us to prepare homogeneous crosslinked compositions from these two immiscible components with a wide variety of physical properties.

LanguageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationACS Symposium Series
PublisherAmerican Chemical Society
Pages137-166
Number of pages30
Volume1178
ISBN (Print)9780841230064
StatePublished - 2014
Externally publishedYes

Publication series

NameACS Symposium Series
Volume1178
ISSN (Print)00976156
ISSN (Electronic)19475918

Profile

polyol
silanol
Polyols
Amides
Raw materials
Oils
Triglycerides
Silanes
Soybean Oil
Soybean Proteins
Polyesters
Interpenetrating polymer networks
Polyurethanes
Petroleum
Protective coatings
Silicones
Unsaturated Fatty Acids
Ultraviolet radiation
Dimers
Ether

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Chemistry(all)
  • Chemical Engineering(all)

Cite this

Graiver, D., Farminer, K. W., & Narayan, R. (2014). Soybean-based polyols and silanols. In ACS Symposium Series (Vol. 1178, pp. 137-166). (ACS Symposium Series; Vol. 1178). American Chemical Society.

Soybean-based polyols and silanols. / Graiver, D.; Farminer, K. W.; Narayan, R.

ACS Symposium Series. Vol. 1178 American Chemical Society, 2014. p. 137-166 (ACS Symposium Series; Vol. 1178).

Research output: ResearchConference contribution

Graiver, D, Farminer, KW & Narayan, R 2014, Soybean-based polyols and silanols. in ACS Symposium Series. vol. 1178, ACS Symposium Series, vol. 1178, American Chemical Society, pp. 137-166.
Graiver D, Farminer KW, Narayan R. Soybean-based polyols and silanols. In ACS Symposium Series. Vol. 1178. American Chemical Society. 2014. p. 137-166. (ACS Symposium Series).
Graiver, D. ; Farminer, K. W. ; Narayan, R./ Soybean-based polyols and silanols. ACS Symposium Series. Vol. 1178 American Chemical Society, 2014. pp. 137-166 (ACS Symposium Series).
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