13C-Labeling the carbon-fixation pathway of a highly efficient artificial photosynthetic system

Chong Liu, Shannon N. Nangle, Brendan C. Colón, Pamela A. Silver, Daniel G. Nocera

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    Interfacing the CO2-fixing microorganism, Ralstonia eutropha, to the energy derived from hydrogen produced by water splitting is a viable approach to achieving renewable CO2 reduction at high efficiencies. We employ 13C-labeling to report on the nature of CO2 reduction in the inorganic water splitting/R. eutropha hybrid system. Accumulated biomass in a reactor under a 13C-enriched CO2 atmosphere may be sampled at different time points during CO2 reduction. Converting the sampled biomass into gaseous CO2 allows the 13C/12C ratio to be determined by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. After 2 hours of inoculation and the initiation of water splitting, the microbes adapted and began to convert CO2 into biomass. The observed time evolution of the 13C/12C ratio in accumulated biomass is consistent with a Monod model for carbon fixation. Carbon dioxide produced by catabolism was found to be minimal. This rapid response of the bacteria to a hydrogen input and to subsequent CO2 reduction at high efficiency are beneficial to achieving artificial photosynthesis for the storage of renewable energy.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)529-537
    Number of pages9
    JournalFaraday Discussions
    Volume198
    DOIs
    StatePublished - 2017

    Profile

    biomass
    Carbon Cycle
    Biomass
    Panthera
    water splitting
    Water
    microorganisms
    marking
    carbon
    hydrogen
    Cupriavidus necator
    Hydrogen
    Fusobacterium
    Mastication
    catabolism
    photosynthesis
    renewable energy
    inoculation
    gas chromatography
    fixing

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Medicine(all)
    • Physical and Theoretical Chemistry

    Cite this

    Liu, C., Nangle, S. N., Colón, B. C., Silver, P. A., & Nocera, D. G. (2017). 13C-Labeling the carbon-fixation pathway of a highly efficient artificial photosynthetic system. Faraday Discussions, 198, 529-537. DOI: 10.1039/c6fd00231e

    13C-Labeling the carbon-fixation pathway of a highly efficient artificial photosynthetic system. / Liu, Chong; Nangle, Shannon N.; Colón, Brendan C.; Silver, Pamela A.; Nocera, Daniel G.

    In: Faraday Discussions, Vol. 198, 2017, p. 529-537.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Liu, C, Nangle, SN, Colón, BC, Silver, PA & Nocera, DG 2017, '13C-Labeling the carbon-fixation pathway of a highly efficient artificial photosynthetic system' Faraday Discussions, vol 198, pp. 529-537. DOI: 10.1039/c6fd00231e
    Liu C, Nangle SN, Colón BC, Silver PA, Nocera DG. 13C-Labeling the carbon-fixation pathway of a highly efficient artificial photosynthetic system. Faraday Discussions. 2017;198:529-537. Available from, DOI: 10.1039/c6fd00231e

    Liu, Chong; Nangle, Shannon N.; Colón, Brendan C.; Silver, Pamela A.; Nocera, Daniel G. / 13C-Labeling the carbon-fixation pathway of a highly efficient artificial photosynthetic system.

    In: Faraday Discussions, Vol. 198, 2017, p. 529-537.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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