Tethered lipid bilayers on electrolessly deposited gold for bioelectrical applications

Neeraj Kohli, Brian L. Hassler, Lavanya Parthasarathy, Rudy J. Richardson, Robert Y. Ofoli, Robert M. Worden, Iisoon Lee

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    • 18 Citations

    Abstract

    This paper presents the formation of a novel biomimetic interface consisting of an electrolessly deposited gold film overlaid with a tethered bilayer lipid membrane (tBLM). Self-assembly of colloidal gold particles was used to create an electrolessly deposited gold film on a glass slide. The properties of the film were characterized using field-effect scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy, and atomic force microscopy. Bilayer lipid membranes were then tethered to the gold film by first depositing an inner molecular leaflet using a mixture of 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine-N-[3- (2-pyridyldithio)propionate], 1,2-di-O-phytanyl-sn-glycero-3- phosphoethanolamine (DPGP), and cystamine in ethanol onto a freshly prepared electrolessly deposited gold surface. The outer leaflet was then formed by the fusion of liposomes made from DPGP or 1,2-dioleoylsn- glycero-3-phosphocholine on the inner leaflet. To provide functionality, two membrane biomolecules were also incorporated into the tBLMs: the ionophore valinomycin and a segment of neuropathy target esterase containing the esterase domain. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, UV/visible spectroscopy, and fluorescence recovery after pattern photobleaching were used to characterize the resulting biomimetic interfaces and confirm the biomolecule activity of the membrane. Microcontact printing was used to form arrays of electrolessly deposited gold patterns on glass slides. Subsequent deposition of lipids yielded arrays of tBLMs. This approach can be extended to form functional biomimetic interfaces on a wide range of inexpensive materials, including plastics. Potential applications include high-throughput screening of drugs and chemicals that interact with cell membranes and for probing, and possibly controlling, interactions between living cells and synthetic membranes. In addition, the gold electrode provides the possibility of electrochemical applications, including biocatalysis, bio-fuel cells, and biosensors.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)3327-3335
    Number of pages9
    JournalBiomacromolecules
    Volume7
    Issue number12
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Dec 2006

    Profile

    Lipid Bilayers
    Gold
    Arthroscopy
    Biomimetics
    Bronchiolo-Alveolar Adenocarcinoma
    Autoantibodies
    Lipid bilayers
    Membranes
    Esterases
    Membrane Lipids
    Glass
    Spectrum Analysis
    Cell Membrane
    Biomolecules
    Cystamine
    Biocatalysis
    Fluorescence Recovery After Photobleaching
    Dielectric Spectroscopy
    Valinomycin
    Gold Colloid

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Organic Chemistry
    • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
    • Polymers and Plastics
    • Materials Chemistry

    Cite this

    Tethered lipid bilayers on electrolessly deposited gold for bioelectrical applications. / Kohli, Neeraj; Hassler, Brian L.; Parthasarathy, Lavanya; Richardson, Rudy J.; Ofoli, Robert Y.; Worden, Robert M.; Lee, Iisoon.

    In: Biomacromolecules, Vol. 7, No. 12, 12.2006, p. 3327-3335.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Kohli, N, Hassler, BL, Parthasarathy, L, Richardson, RJ, Ofoli, RY, Worden, RM & Lee, I 2006, 'Tethered lipid bilayers on electrolessly deposited gold for bioelectrical applications' Biomacromolecules, vol 7, no. 12, pp. 3327-3335. DOI: 10.1021/bm0603995
    Kohli N, Hassler BL, Parthasarathy L, Richardson RJ, Ofoli RY, Worden RM et al. Tethered lipid bilayers on electrolessly deposited gold for bioelectrical applications. Biomacromolecules. 2006 Dec;7(12):3327-3335. Available from, DOI: 10.1021/bm0603995

    Kohli, Neeraj; Hassler, Brian L.; Parthasarathy, Lavanya; Richardson, Rudy J.; Ofoli, Robert Y.; Worden, Robert M.; Lee, Iisoon / Tethered lipid bilayers on electrolessly deposited gold for bioelectrical applications.

    In: Biomacromolecules, Vol. 7, No. 12, 12.2006, p. 3327-3335.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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    abstract = "This paper presents the formation of a novel biomimetic interface consisting of an electrolessly deposited gold film overlaid with a tethered bilayer lipid membrane (tBLM). Self-assembly of colloidal gold particles was used to create an electrolessly deposited gold film on a glass slide. The properties of the film were characterized using field-effect scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy, and atomic force microscopy. Bilayer lipid membranes were then tethered to the gold film by first depositing an inner molecular leaflet using a mixture of 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine-N-[3- (2-pyridyldithio)propionate], 1,2-di-O-phytanyl-sn-glycero-3- phosphoethanolamine (DPGP), and cystamine in ethanol onto a freshly prepared electrolessly deposited gold surface. The outer leaflet was then formed by the fusion of liposomes made from DPGP or 1,2-dioleoylsn- glycero-3-phosphocholine on the inner leaflet. To provide functionality, two membrane biomolecules were also incorporated into the tBLMs: the ionophore valinomycin and a segment of neuropathy target esterase containing the esterase domain. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, UV/visible spectroscopy, and fluorescence recovery after pattern photobleaching were used to characterize the resulting biomimetic interfaces and confirm the biomolecule activity of the membrane. Microcontact printing was used to form arrays of electrolessly deposited gold patterns on glass slides. Subsequent deposition of lipids yielded arrays of tBLMs. This approach can be extended to form functional biomimetic interfaces on a wide range of inexpensive materials, including plastics. Potential applications include high-throughput screening of drugs and chemicals that interact with cell membranes and for probing, and possibly controlling, interactions between living cells and synthetic membranes. In addition, the gold electrode provides the possibility of electrochemical applications, including biocatalysis, bio-fuel cells, and biosensors.",
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