The effects of temperature and hydrogen on glycerol adsorption on ruthenium metal

    Research output: ResearchConference contribution

    Abstract

    Interactions between substrate molecules and the metal catalyst surface were studied to understand the mechanism of aqueous hydrogenolysis of glycerol over noble metals. Efforts to quantify the effects of temperature and adsorbed hydrogen on glycerol (GO) adsorption on ruthenium metal were elucidated. GO did not adsorb in the presence of hydrogen, suggesting exclusion of glycerol from the surface by adsorbed hydrogen. Hydrogen at elevated temperatures would remove adsorbed species in the form of methane. At 80°C the addition of hydrogen stopped the adsorption of GO and all the adsorbed carbon was converted to methane, while at 200°C all adsorbed and solution species were converted to methane with a carbon recovery of > 90%. The quantities of polyols adsorbed were significantly less, on a molar basis, than those obtained from gas-phase chemisorption of H2 and CO, suggesting multiple substrate-metal contact points. This is an abstract of a paper presented at the 2006 AIChE Annual Meeting (San Francisco, CA 11/12-17/2006).

    LanguageEnglish (US)
    Title of host publicationAIChE Annual Meeting, Conference Proceedings
    StatePublished - 2006
    Event2006 AIChE Annual Meeting - San Francisco, CA, United States
    Duration: Nov 12 2006Nov 17 2006

    Other

    Other2006 AIChE Annual Meeting
    CountryUnited States
    CitySan Francisco, CA
    Period11/12/0611/17/06

    Profile

    Ruthenium
    Glycerol
    Hydrogen
    Metals
    Adsorption
    Temperature
    Methane
    Carbon
    Substrates
    Hydrogenolysis
    Point contacts
    Carbon Monoxide
    Chemisorption
    Precious metals
    Gases
    Recovery
    Catalysts
    Molecules
    polyol
    Polyols

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Biotechnology
    • Chemical Engineering(all)
    • Bioengineering
    • Safety, Risk, Reliability and Quality

    Cite this

    The effects of temperature and hydrogen on glycerol adsorption on ruthenium metal. / Peereboom, Lars; Jackson, J. E.; Miller, Dennis J.

    AIChE Annual Meeting, Conference Proceedings. 2006.

    Research output: ResearchConference contribution

    Peereboom, L, Jackson, JE & Miller, DJ 2006, The effects of temperature and hydrogen on glycerol adsorption on ruthenium metal. in AIChE Annual Meeting, Conference Proceedings. 2006 AIChE Annual Meeting, San Francisco, CA, United States, 11/12/06.
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    AU - Jackson,J. E.

    AU - Miller,Dennis J.

    PY - 2006

    Y1 - 2006

    N2 - Interactions between substrate molecules and the metal catalyst surface were studied to understand the mechanism of aqueous hydrogenolysis of glycerol over noble metals. Efforts to quantify the effects of temperature and adsorbed hydrogen on glycerol (GO) adsorption on ruthenium metal were elucidated. GO did not adsorb in the presence of hydrogen, suggesting exclusion of glycerol from the surface by adsorbed hydrogen. Hydrogen at elevated temperatures would remove adsorbed species in the form of methane. At 80°C the addition of hydrogen stopped the adsorption of GO and all the adsorbed carbon was converted to methane, while at 200°C all adsorbed and solution species were converted to methane with a carbon recovery of > 90%. The quantities of polyols adsorbed were significantly less, on a molar basis, than those obtained from gas-phase chemisorption of H2 and CO, suggesting multiple substrate-metal contact points. This is an abstract of a paper presented at the 2006 AIChE Annual Meeting (San Francisco, CA 11/12-17/2006).

    AB - Interactions between substrate molecules and the metal catalyst surface were studied to understand the mechanism of aqueous hydrogenolysis of glycerol over noble metals. Efforts to quantify the effects of temperature and adsorbed hydrogen on glycerol (GO) adsorption on ruthenium metal were elucidated. GO did not adsorb in the presence of hydrogen, suggesting exclusion of glycerol from the surface by adsorbed hydrogen. Hydrogen at elevated temperatures would remove adsorbed species in the form of methane. At 80°C the addition of hydrogen stopped the adsorption of GO and all the adsorbed carbon was converted to methane, while at 200°C all adsorbed and solution species were converted to methane with a carbon recovery of > 90%. The quantities of polyols adsorbed were significantly less, on a molar basis, than those obtained from gas-phase chemisorption of H2 and CO, suggesting multiple substrate-metal contact points. This is an abstract of a paper presented at the 2006 AIChE Annual Meeting (San Francisco, CA 11/12-17/2006).

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