The impact of supportive housing on neighborhood crime rates

George Galster, Kathryn Pettit, Anna Santiago, Peter Tatian

Research output: Research - peer-reviewArticle

  • 25 Citations

Abstract

Quantitative and qualitative methods are employed to investigate the extent to which proximity to 14 supportive housing facilities opening in Denver from 1992 to 1995 affects crime rates. The econometric specification provides pre- and post- controls for selection bias as well as a spatial autocorrelation correction. Focus groups with homeowners living near supportive housing provide richer context for interpreting the econometric results. The findings suggests that developers paying close attention to facility scale and siting can avoid negative neighborhood impacts and render their supportive housing invisible to neighbors. Implications for structuring local regulations and public education regarding supportive housing facilities follow.

LanguageEnglish (US)
Pages289-315
Number of pages27
JournalJournal of Urban Affairs
Volume24
Issue number3
StatePublished - 2002
Externally publishedYes

Profile

crime rate
housing
crime
rate
econometrics
homeowner
public education
quantitative method
qualitative method
regulation
trend
Group
autocorrelation
education
method
public

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Urban Studies

Cite this

Galster, G., Pettit, K., Santiago, A., & Tatian, P. (2002). The impact of supportive housing on neighborhood crime rates. Journal of Urban Affairs, 24(3), 289-315.

The impact of supportive housing on neighborhood crime rates. / Galster, George; Pettit, Kathryn; Santiago, Anna; Tatian, Peter.

In: Journal of Urban Affairs, Vol. 24, No. 3, 2002, p. 289-315.

Research output: Research - peer-reviewArticle

Galster, G, Pettit, K, Santiago, A & Tatian, P 2002, 'The impact of supportive housing on neighborhood crime rates' Journal of Urban Affairs, vol 24, no. 3, pp. 289-315.
Galster, George ; Pettit, Kathryn ; Santiago, Anna ; Tatian, Peter. / The impact of supportive housing on neighborhood crime rates. In: Journal of Urban Affairs. 2002 ; Vol. 24, No. 3. pp. 289-315
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