Thermal properties of hyperbranched polyesters

Adina Dumitrascu, Abhijit Sarkar, Jianfang Chai, Tracy Zhang, Robert A. Bubeck, Bob A. Howell, Patrick B. Smith

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    Hyperbranched poly(ester)s (HBPE) possess attributes for applications in a number of areas which include platforms for controlled release of actives and as rheology modifiers and coalescent agents in coatings. For the latter applications, properties such as the glass transition temperature and thermal stability are important. A number of HBPEs were produced with varying composition, molecular weight, degree of branching and end-group functionality in order to determine the effect of each on the HBPE thermal and rheological properties. These materials were synthesized from trimethylolpropane and the difunctional acids; adipic, phthalic and terephthalic. The chemical structure of the resulting HBPEs was fully characterized, particularly by SEC and NMR, and the thermal properties by DSC and TG. The glass transition temperature was found to depend primarily on HBPE composition and end-group functionality. The prominent feature of the thermal degradation for the hydroxyl-capped HBPE was dehydrative ether formation while that for carboxyl-capped polymers was decarboxylation.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)1-8
    Number of pages8
    JournalJournal of Thermal Analysis and Calorimetry
    DOIs
    StateAccepted/In press - Apr 28 2017

    Profile

    esters
    glass transition temperature
    thermodynamic properties
    African horse sickness virus
    Ageusia
    Intestinal Atresia
    decarboxylation
    thermal degradation
    polyesters
    rheology
    molecular weight
    ethers
    thermal stability
    platforms
    coatings
    nuclear magnetic resonance
    acids
    polymers
    Inborn Errors Amino Acid Metabolism
    Acetabularia

    Keywords

    • Decarboxylation
    • Dehydrative ether formation
    • DSC
    • Glass transition
    • Hyperbranched polymer
    • Poly(ester) degradation
    • Rheology
    • Thermogravimetry

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Condensed Matter Physics
    • Physical and Theoretical Chemistry

    Cite this

    Thermal properties of hyperbranched polyesters. / Dumitrascu, Adina; Sarkar, Abhijit; Chai, Jianfang; Zhang, Tracy; Bubeck, Robert A.; Howell, Bob A.; Smith, Patrick B.

    In: Journal of Thermal Analysis and Calorimetry, 28.04.2017, p. 1-8.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Dumitrascu A, Sarkar A, Chai J, Zhang T, Bubeck RA, Howell BA et al. Thermal properties of hyperbranched polyesters. Journal of Thermal Analysis and Calorimetry. 2017 Apr 28;1-8. Available from, DOI: 10.1007/s10973-017-6408-z

    Dumitrascu, Adina; Sarkar, Abhijit; Chai, Jianfang; Zhang, Tracy; Bubeck, Robert A.; Howell, Bob A.; Smith, Patrick B. / Thermal properties of hyperbranched polyesters.

    In: Journal of Thermal Analysis and Calorimetry, 28.04.2017, p. 1-8.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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