Three-dimensional T1ρ-weighted MRI at 1.5 Tesla

Arijitt Borthakur, Andrew Wheaton, Sridhar R. Charagundla, Erik M. Shapiro, Ravinder R. Regatte, Sarma V S Akella, J. Bruce Kneeland, Ravinder Reddy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Purpose: To design and implement a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) pulse sequence capable of performing three-dimensional T-weighted MRI on a 1.5-T clinical scanner, and determine the optimal sequence parameters, both theoretically and experimentally, so that the energy deposition by the radiofrequency pulses in the sequence, measured as the specific absorption rate (SAR), does not exceed safety guidelines for imaging human subjects. Materials and Methods: A three-pulse cluster was pre-encoded to a three-dimensional gradient-echo imaging sequence to create a three-dimensional, T-weighted MRI pulse sequence. Imaging experiments were performed on a GE clinical scanner with a custom-built knee-coil. We validated the performance of this sequence by imaging articular cartilage of a bovine patella and comparing T values measured by this sequence to those obtained with a previously tested two-dimensional imaging sequence. Using a previously developed model for SAR calculation, the imaging parameters were adjusted such that the energy deposition by the radiofrequency pulses in the sequence did not exceed safety guidelines for imaging human subjects. The actual temperature increase due to the sequence was measured in a phantom by a MRI-based temperature mapping technique. Following these experiments, the performance of this sequence was demonstrated in viva by obtaining T-weighted images of the knee joint of a healthy individual. Results: Calculated T of articular cartilage in the specimen was similar for both and three-dimensional and two-dimensional methods (84 ± 2 msec and 80 ± 3 msec, respectively). The temperature increase in the phantom resulting from the sequence was 0.015°C, which is well below the established safety guidelines. Images of the human knee joint in vivo demonstrate a clear delineation of cartilage from surrounding tissues. Conclusion: We developed and implemented a three-dimensional T-weighted pulse sequence on a 1.5-T clinical scanner.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)730-736
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Volume17
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2003
Externally publishedYes

Profile

Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Safety
Articular Cartilage
Knee Joint
Temperature
Patella
Cartilage
Knee

Keywords

  • Cartilage
  • RF heating
  • SAR
  • Spin-lock
  • T

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Radiological and Ultrasound Technology

Cite this

Borthakur, A., Wheaton, A., Charagundla, S. R., Shapiro, E. M., Regatte, R. R., Akella, S. V. S., ... Reddy, R. (2003). Three-dimensional T1ρ-weighted MRI at 1.5 Tesla. Journal of Magnetic Resonance Imaging, 17(6), 730-736. DOI: 10.1002/jmri.10296

Three-dimensional T1ρ-weighted MRI at 1.5 Tesla. / Borthakur, Arijitt; Wheaton, Andrew; Charagundla, Sridhar R.; Shapiro, Erik M.; Regatte, Ravinder R.; Akella, Sarma V S; Kneeland, J. Bruce; Reddy, Ravinder.

In: Journal of Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Vol. 17, No. 6, 01.06.2003, p. 730-736.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Borthakur, A, Wheaton, A, Charagundla, SR, Shapiro, EM, Regatte, RR, Akella, SVS, Kneeland, JB & Reddy, R 2003, 'Three-dimensional T1ρ-weighted MRI at 1.5 Tesla' Journal of Magnetic Resonance Imaging, vol 17, no. 6, pp. 730-736. DOI: 10.1002/jmri.10296
Borthakur A, Wheaton A, Charagundla SR, Shapiro EM, Regatte RR, Akella SVS et al. Three-dimensional T1ρ-weighted MRI at 1.5 Tesla. Journal of Magnetic Resonance Imaging. 2003 Jun 1;17(6):730-736. Available from, DOI: 10.1002/jmri.10296

Borthakur, Arijitt; Wheaton, Andrew; Charagundla, Sridhar R.; Shapiro, Erik M.; Regatte, Ravinder R.; Akella, Sarma V S; Kneeland, J. Bruce; Reddy, Ravinder / Three-dimensional T1ρ-weighted MRI at 1.5 Tesla.

In: Journal of Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Vol. 17, No. 6, 01.06.2003, p. 730-736.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Purpose: To design and implement a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) pulse sequence capable of performing three-dimensional T1ρ-weighted MRI on a 1.5-T clinical scanner, and determine the optimal sequence parameters, both theoretically and experimentally, so that the energy deposition by the radiofrequency pulses in the sequence, measured as the specific absorption rate (SAR), does not exceed safety guidelines for imaging human subjects. Materials and Methods: A three-pulse cluster was pre-encoded to a three-dimensional gradient-echo imaging sequence to create a three-dimensional, T1ρ-weighted MRI pulse sequence. Imaging experiments were performed on a GE clinical scanner with a custom-built knee-coil. We validated the performance of this sequence by imaging articular cartilage of a bovine patella and comparing T1ρ values measured by this sequence to those obtained with a previously tested two-dimensional imaging sequence. Using a previously developed model for SAR calculation, the imaging parameters were adjusted such that the energy deposition by the radiofrequency pulses in the sequence did not exceed safety guidelines for imaging human subjects. The actual temperature increase due to the sequence was measured in a phantom by a MRI-based temperature mapping technique. Following these experiments, the performance of this sequence was demonstrated in viva by obtaining T1ρ-weighted images of the knee joint of a healthy individual. Results: Calculated T1ρ of articular cartilage in the specimen was similar for both and three-dimensional and two-dimensional methods (84 ± 2 msec and 80 ± 3 msec, respectively). The temperature increase in the phantom resulting from the sequence was 0.015°C, which is well below the established safety guidelines. Images of the human knee joint in vivo demonstrate a clear delineation of cartilage from surrounding tissues. Conclusion: We developed and implemented a three-dimensional T1ρ-weighted pulse sequence on a 1.5-T clinical scanner.",
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