Time controlled protein release from layer-by-layer assembled multilayer functionalized agarose hydrogels

Sumit Mehrotra, Daniel Lynam, Ryan Maloney, Kendell M. Pawelec, Mark H. Tuszynski, Ilsoon Lee, Christina Chan, Jeffrey Sakamoto

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

  • 68 Citations

Abstract

Axons of the adult central nervous system exhibit an extremely limited ability to regenerate after spinal cord injury. Experimentally generated patterns of axon growth are typically disorganized and randomly oriented. Support of linear axonal growth into spinal cord lesion sites has been demonstrated using arrays of uniaxial channels, templated with agarose hydrogel, and containing genetically engineered cells that secrete brain-derived neurotrophic factor (8DNF). However, immobilizing neurotrophic factors secreting cells within a scaffold is relatively cumbersome, and alternative strategies are needed to provide sustained release of BDNF from templated agarose scaffolds. Existing methods of loading the drug or protein into hydrogels cannot provide sustained release from templated aprose hydrogels. Alternatively, here it is shown that pH-responsive H-bonded poly(ethylene glycoI)(PEG)/poly{acrylic acid)(PAA)/protein hybrid layer-bylayer (LbL) thin films, when prepared over agarose, provided sustained release of protein under physiological conditions for more than four weeks. Lysozyme, a protein similar in size and isoelectric point to BDNF, is released from the multilayers on the agarose and is biologically active during the earlier time points, with decreasing activity at later time points. This is the first demonstration of month-long sustained protein release from an agarose hydrogel, whereby the drug/protein is loaded separately from the agarose hydrogel fabrication process.

LanguageEnglish (US)
Pages247-258
Number of pages12
JournalAdvanced Functional Materials
Volume20
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 22 2010

Profile

Hydrogels
Sepharose
Multilayers
proteins
Proteins
Hydrogel
Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor
axons
carbopol 940
Scaffolds
drugs
spinal cord injuries
spinal cord
central nervous system
lysozyme
Nerve Growth Factors
Neurology
acrylic acid
Scaffolds (biology)
Muramidase

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biomaterials
  • Electrochemistry
  • Condensed Matter Physics
  • Electronic, Optical and Magnetic Materials

Cite this

Mehrotra, S., Lynam, D., Maloney, R., Pawelec, K. M., Tuszynski, M. H., Lee, I., ... Sakamoto, J. (2010). Time controlled protein release from layer-by-layer assembled multilayer functionalized agarose hydrogels. Advanced Functional Materials, 20(2), 247-258. DOI: 10.1002/adfm.200901172

Time controlled protein release from layer-by-layer assembled multilayer functionalized agarose hydrogels. / Mehrotra, Sumit; Lynam, Daniel; Maloney, Ryan; Pawelec, Kendell M.; Tuszynski, Mark H.; Lee, Ilsoon; Chan, Christina; Sakamoto, Jeffrey.

In: Advanced Functional Materials, Vol. 20, No. 2, 22.01.2010, p. 247-258.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Mehrotra, S, Lynam, D, Maloney, R, Pawelec, KM, Tuszynski, MH, Lee, I, Chan, C & Sakamoto, J 2010, 'Time controlled protein release from layer-by-layer assembled multilayer functionalized agarose hydrogels' Advanced Functional Materials, vol 20, no. 2, pp. 247-258. DOI: 10.1002/adfm.200901172
Mehrotra S, Lynam D, Maloney R, Pawelec KM, Tuszynski MH, Lee I et al. Time controlled protein release from layer-by-layer assembled multilayer functionalized agarose hydrogels. Advanced Functional Materials. 2010 Jan 22;20(2):247-258. Available from, DOI: 10.1002/adfm.200901172
Mehrotra, Sumit ; Lynam, Daniel ; Maloney, Ryan ; Pawelec, Kendell M. ; Tuszynski, Mark H. ; Lee, Ilsoon ; Chan, Christina ; Sakamoto, Jeffrey. / Time controlled protein release from layer-by-layer assembled multilayer functionalized agarose hydrogels. In: Advanced Functional Materials. 2010 ; Vol. 20, No. 2. pp. 247-258
@article{30433b7cfec74a29b11afa0b8646513c,
title = "Time controlled protein release from layer-by-layer assembled multilayer functionalized agarose hydrogels",
abstract = "Axons of the adult central nervous system exhibit an extremely limited ability to regenerate after spinal cord injury. Experimentally generated patterns of axon growth are typically disorganized and randomly oriented. Support of linear axonal growth into spinal cord lesion sites has been demonstrated using arrays of uniaxial channels, templated with agarose hydrogel, and containing genetically engineered cells that secrete brain-derived neurotrophic factor (8DNF). However, immobilizing neurotrophic factors secreting cells within a scaffold is relatively cumbersome, and alternative strategies are needed to provide sustained release of BDNF from templated agarose scaffolds. Existing methods of loading the drug or protein into hydrogels cannot provide sustained release from templated aprose hydrogels. Alternatively, here it is shown that pH-responsive H-bonded poly(ethylene glycoI)(PEG)/poly{acrylic acid)(PAA)/protein hybrid layer-bylayer (LbL) thin films, when prepared over agarose, provided sustained release of protein under physiological conditions for more than four weeks. Lysozyme, a protein similar in size and isoelectric point to BDNF, is released from the multilayers on the agarose and is biologically active during the earlier time points, with decreasing activity at later time points. This is the first demonstration of month-long sustained protein release from an agarose hydrogel, whereby the drug/protein is loaded separately from the agarose hydrogel fabrication process.",
author = "Sumit Mehrotra and Daniel Lynam and Ryan Maloney and Pawelec, {Kendell M.} and Tuszynski, {Mark H.} and Ilsoon Lee and Christina Chan and Jeffrey Sakamoto",
year = "2010",
month = "1",
day = "22",
doi = "10.1002/adfm.200901172",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "20",
pages = "247--258",
journal = "Advanced Functional Materials",
issn = "1616-301X",
publisher = "Wiley-VCH Verlag",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Time controlled protein release from layer-by-layer assembled multilayer functionalized agarose hydrogels

AU - Mehrotra,Sumit

AU - Lynam,Daniel

AU - Maloney,Ryan

AU - Pawelec,Kendell M.

AU - Tuszynski,Mark H.

AU - Lee,Ilsoon

AU - Chan,Christina

AU - Sakamoto,Jeffrey

PY - 2010/1/22

Y1 - 2010/1/22

N2 - Axons of the adult central nervous system exhibit an extremely limited ability to regenerate after spinal cord injury. Experimentally generated patterns of axon growth are typically disorganized and randomly oriented. Support of linear axonal growth into spinal cord lesion sites has been demonstrated using arrays of uniaxial channels, templated with agarose hydrogel, and containing genetically engineered cells that secrete brain-derived neurotrophic factor (8DNF). However, immobilizing neurotrophic factors secreting cells within a scaffold is relatively cumbersome, and alternative strategies are needed to provide sustained release of BDNF from templated agarose scaffolds. Existing methods of loading the drug or protein into hydrogels cannot provide sustained release from templated aprose hydrogels. Alternatively, here it is shown that pH-responsive H-bonded poly(ethylene glycoI)(PEG)/poly{acrylic acid)(PAA)/protein hybrid layer-bylayer (LbL) thin films, when prepared over agarose, provided sustained release of protein under physiological conditions for more than four weeks. Lysozyme, a protein similar in size and isoelectric point to BDNF, is released from the multilayers on the agarose and is biologically active during the earlier time points, with decreasing activity at later time points. This is the first demonstration of month-long sustained protein release from an agarose hydrogel, whereby the drug/protein is loaded separately from the agarose hydrogel fabrication process.

AB - Axons of the adult central nervous system exhibit an extremely limited ability to regenerate after spinal cord injury. Experimentally generated patterns of axon growth are typically disorganized and randomly oriented. Support of linear axonal growth into spinal cord lesion sites has been demonstrated using arrays of uniaxial channels, templated with agarose hydrogel, and containing genetically engineered cells that secrete brain-derived neurotrophic factor (8DNF). However, immobilizing neurotrophic factors secreting cells within a scaffold is relatively cumbersome, and alternative strategies are needed to provide sustained release of BDNF from templated agarose scaffolds. Existing methods of loading the drug or protein into hydrogels cannot provide sustained release from templated aprose hydrogels. Alternatively, here it is shown that pH-responsive H-bonded poly(ethylene glycoI)(PEG)/poly{acrylic acid)(PAA)/protein hybrid layer-bylayer (LbL) thin films, when prepared over agarose, provided sustained release of protein under physiological conditions for more than four weeks. Lysozyme, a protein similar in size and isoelectric point to BDNF, is released from the multilayers on the agarose and is biologically active during the earlier time points, with decreasing activity at later time points. This is the first demonstration of month-long sustained protein release from an agarose hydrogel, whereby the drug/protein is loaded separately from the agarose hydrogel fabrication process.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=74349083656&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=74349083656&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1002/adfm.200901172

DO - 10.1002/adfm.200901172

M3 - Article

VL - 20

SP - 247

EP - 258

JO - Advanced Functional Materials

T2 - Advanced Functional Materials

JF - Advanced Functional Materials

SN - 1616-301X

IS - 2

ER -