Top-illuminated organic photovoltaics on a variety of opaque substrates with vapor-printed poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) top electrodes and moo 3 buffer layer

Miles C. Barr, Rachel M. Howden, Richard R. Lunt, Vladimir Bulovic, Karen K. Gleason

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

  • 31 Citations

Abstract

Organic photovoltaics devices typically utilize illumination through a transparent substrate, such as glass or an optically clear plastic. Utilization of opaque substrates, including low cost foils, papers, and textiles, requires architectures that instead allow illumination through the top of the device. Here, we demonstrate top-illuminated organic photovoltaics, employing a dry vaporprinted poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) polymer anode deposited by oxidative chemical vapor deposition (oCVD) on top of a small-molecule organic heterojunction based on vacuum-evaporated tetraphenyldibenzoperifl anthene (DBP) and C 60 heterojunctions. Application of a molybdenum trioxide (MoO 3 ) buffer layer prior to oCVD deposition increases the device photocurrent nearly 10 times by preventing oxidation of the underlying photoactive DBP electron donor layer during the oCVD PEDOT deposition, and resulting in power conversion effi ciencies of up to 2.8% for the top-illuminated, ITO-free devices, approximately 75% that of the conventional cell architecture with indium-tin oxide (ITO) transparent anode (3.7%). Finally, we demonstrate the broad applicability of this architecture by fabricating devices on a variety of opaque surfaces, including common paper products with over 2.0% power conversion effi ciency, the highest to date on such fi ber-based substrates.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1404-1409
Number of pages6
JournalAdvanced Energy Materials
Volume2
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2012
Externally publishedYes

Profile

Substrates
Chemical vapor deposition
Buffer layers
Tin oxides
Indium
Heterojunctions
Anodes
Lighting
Cleidocranial Dysplasia
Brain Death
Autopsy
Psychologic Desensitization
Paper products
Photocurrents
Metal foil
Molybdenum
Textiles
Vapors
Vacuum
Plastics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Renewable Energy, Sustainability and the Environment
  • Materials Science(all)

Cite this

Top-illuminated organic photovoltaics on a variety of opaque substrates with vapor-printed poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) top electrodes and moo 3 buffer layer. / Barr, Miles C.; Howden, Rachel M.; Lunt, Richard R.; Bulovic, Vladimir; Gleason, Karen K.

In: Advanced Energy Materials, Vol. 2, No. 11, 11.2012, p. 1404-1409.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Barr, Miles C.; Howden, Rachel M.; Lunt, Richard R.; Bulovic, Vladimir; Gleason, Karen K. / Top-illuminated organic photovoltaics on a variety of opaque substrates with vapor-printed poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) top electrodes and moo 3 buffer layer.

In: Advanced Energy Materials, Vol. 2, No. 11, 11.2012, p. 1404-1409.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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