Versatile bioelectronic interfaces on flexible non-conductive substrates

Brian L. Hassler, Ted J. Amundsen, J. Gregory Zeikus, Ilsoon Lee, Robert M. Worden

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

  • 10 Citations

Abstract

Bioelectronic interfaces that establish electrical communication between redox enzymes and electrodes have potential applications as biosensors, biocatalytic reactors, and biological fuel cells. These interfaces are commonly formed on gold films deposited using physical vapor deposition (PVD) or chemical vapor deposition (CVD). PVD and CVD require deposition of a primer layer, such as titanium or chromium, and require the use of expensive equipment and cannot be used on a wide range of substrates. This paper describes a versatile new bench-top method to form bioelectronic interfaces containing a gold film, electron mediator, cofactor, and dehydrogenase enzyme (secondary alcohol dehydrogenase, and sorbitol dehydrogenase) on nonconductive substrates such as polystyrene and glass. The method combines layer-by-layer deposition of polyelectrolytes, electroless metal deposition, and directed molecular self-assembly. Cyclic voltammetry, chronoamperometry, field emission X-ray dispersive spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and atomic force microscopy were used to characterize the bioelectronic interfaces. Interfaces formed on flexible polystyrene slides were shown to retain their activity after bending to a radius of curvature of 18 mm, confirming that the approach can be applied on cheap and flexible substrates for applications where traditional wafer-scale electronics is not suitable, such as personal or structural health monitors and rolled microtube biosensors.

LanguageEnglish (US)
Pages1481-1487
Number of pages7
JournalBiosensors and Bioelectronics
Volume23
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - May 15 2008

Profile

Biosensing Techniques
Polystyrenes
Physical vapor deposition
Biosensors
Gold
Chemical vapor deposition
Substrates
Enzymes
Electronic scales
L-Iditol 2-Dehydrogenase
Biological fuel cells
X-Ray Emission Spectrometry
Chronoamperometry
Atomic Force Microscopy
Coenzymes
Chromium
Titanium
Polyelectrolytes
Field emission
Electron Scanning Microscopy

Keywords

  • Bioelectronic interface
  • Biosensor
  • Dehydrogenase
  • Electroless deposition
  • Flexible
  • Plastic

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biotechnology
  • Analytical Chemistry
  • Electrochemistry

Cite this

Versatile bioelectronic interfaces on flexible non-conductive substrates. / Hassler, Brian L.; Amundsen, Ted J.; Zeikus, J. Gregory; Lee, Ilsoon; Worden, Robert M.

In: Biosensors and Bioelectronics, Vol. 23, No. 10, 15.05.2008, p. 1481-1487.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hassler, Brian L. ; Amundsen, Ted J. ; Zeikus, J. Gregory ; Lee, Ilsoon ; Worden, Robert M./ Versatile bioelectronic interfaces on flexible non-conductive substrates. In: Biosensors and Bioelectronics. 2008 ; Vol. 23, No. 10. pp. 1481-1487
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